South Station Tours

November 3, 2012 – Linda Perlman, a Brookline resident and retired special education teacher at the Lincoln School, leads a group of 18 on a tour of Boston’s South Station Saturday. The free tours, which began this past July, take place on the first Saturday of each month and every Thursday. The station was built in 1899 on a landfill for $3.6 million and included such features as the 12-foot windable clock, 8-ton and 8-foot-tall eagle mascot, and a glass ceiling that was later replaced with steel. Photo/Christopher Weigl


November 3, 2012 – Retired Brookline special education teacher Linda Perlman, center, leads a tour group through the normally off-limits second floor of Boston’s South Station on Saturday. “Growing up here I’ve just always loved this station,” she said. “We have something here that’s really worthy of honoring.” The tours are paid for by Equity Office Properties, the station’s managing company. Photo/Christopher Weigl


November 3, 2012 – Tour guide Linda Perlman, a retired special education teacher from Brookline, shows pictures of South Station’s original build prior to extensive renovations in the ’60s and again in the ’80s. Remnants of past projects still remain, however, including a suburban track nicknamed the “ghost terminal” that was closed after just one run due to poor ventilation. The terminal was turned into a bowling alley for employees. Photo/Christopher Weigl


November 3, 2012 – A free tour of South Station, led by retired special education teacher Linda Perlman, stops outside the front doors to examine the green National Register of Historic Places plaque mounted on the building’s exterior. The station was rededicated for the centennial celebration in 1989 by then-governor Michael Dukakis. “It opened with such promise but then went through a decayed time,” Perlman said of the building. “Now it’s gone through a rebirth again.” Photo/Christopher Weigl


November 3, 2012 – Retired Brookline special education teacher Linda Perlman, center, wraps up her tour of Boston’s South Station on Saturday by asking attendees to complete a short questionnaire on what they liked and disliked about the one-hour session. The free tours began in July and run on the first Saturday of each month as well as once every Thursday. The purpose, Perlman said, “is to engage people in the building. South Station is not just a place to go to get a train or a bus.” The ultimate goal is to “make the whole building a destination point.” Photo/Christopher Weigl

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